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Energy and Climate Change

British Columbia's oceans, climate and First Nations at risk from Enbridge pipeline review process

Thursday, April 16, 2009

VANCOUVER – Living Oceans Society, the Pembina Institute, and ForestEthics are calling on the federal government to significantly strengthen the proposed environmental assessment for the proposed Enbridge Gateway Pipeline. If built, the dual pipelines would extend from the Alberta tar sands to the British Columbia coast, requiring tankers to ship both crude oil to markets in Asia and the US, and condensate, a product used in tar sands production, to Alberta.

Fuel truck taised From Robson Bight

Wednesday, May 20, 2009

SOINTULA, B.C. -  At 3:00 p.m. yesterday, the fuel truck potentially loaded with approximately 10,000 litres of diesel was successfully recovered from Robson Bight Ecological Reserve. In August 2007 the fuel truck, along with 10 other pieces of equipment, tipped from a barge being towed through Robson Bight which is critical habitat for orca whales.

Canada needs a public inquiry to consider crude oil pipelines: conservation groups

Sunday, August 23, 2009

VANCOUVER – A coalition of community and conservation groups has called on Ottawa to establish a full public inquiry to look into the far-reaching effects of the Enbridge Northern Gateway Pipelines proposal. Enbridge proposes to build twin pipelines carrying crude oil and condensate, a toxic petroleum product, across 1000 rivers and streams BC from the Alberta tar sands to the coast at Kitimat, where massive super tankers would carry oil through dangerous inside coastal waters to Asian markets.

Organizations and community groups condemn Enbridge review process

Wednesday, February 3, 2010

PRINCE RUPERT - Criticism of the federal government’s review of theEnbridge Northern Gateway pipeline proposal is building. Nineteen environmental and community organizations have written to the Canadian Environmental Assessment Agency expressing concern that the terms of reference for the review ignore climate change, tar sands expansion and the question of allowing oil tankers on B.C.'s North Coast.



Environmental groups vow to stop oil pipelines and tankers

Thursday, March 25, 2010

VANCOUVER — One day after the twenty-first anniversary of the Exxon Valdez oil spill, a powerful coalition of environmental groups are putting Enbridge and governments on notice that they will step up their activities to support a Coastal First Nations’ declaration made on Tuesday to keep tar sands oil tankers out of their ancestral territories on Canada’s Pacific North Coast.

Oil spill in Gulf of Mexico proves the need for an oil free coast in British Columbia

Thursday, April 29, 2010

In light of the failed attempts to clean up the oil that is spewing from a sunken rig in the Gulf of Mexico, First Nations and environmental groups are calling on the federal government to implement a permanent ban on oil and gas development and tanker traffic on the North Coast of British Columbia. Despite having the required safety mechanism on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig, an explosion occurred, the technology to stop the oil from spilling in to the ocean failed, and the weather delayed the clean up efforts.

Enbridge applies to federal government to allow oil tankers on the B.C. coast

Thursday, May 27, 2010

SOINTULA, B.C. -- On May 27 Enbridge escalated conflict on the coast when they took steps to break the First Nations ban on tanker traffic by applying to the federal government for approval of their Northern Gateway pipeline.

“Enbridge poses a grave threat to the future of coastal First Nations’ way of life,” says Art Sterritt, Executive Director of the Coastal First Nations. “We will not allow Enbridge to do to us what BP has done to the people of Louisiana.”

Call for Pacific tanker ban intensifies: First Nations and coastal industries join forces in Ottawa to push for legislated solution

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

OTTAWA -– An unprecedented delegation of First Nations, commercial fishing, tourism representatives and environmental groups from Canada’s Pacific North Coast is in Ottawa today, calling on the federal government to ban oil tankers from the region.

The federal government is currently considering allowing over 200 oil tankers per year to travel through some of the most dangerous waters in the world, despite polls that show 80 percent of British Columbians support banning crude oil tankers.

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